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Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish


This fish is great in a sandwich or with some rice

This recipe puts together Creole seasoning, black pepper, lemon juice to create nice 'black' crusted fish fillet. You can choose to either eat as well dressed po'boy sandwich or on its own with some rice.

This recipe is courtesy of Chef Mike Brewer from Copper Vine in New Orleans.

Notes

Enjoy as a po'boy or eat with a side of white rice.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Pound redfish fillets, cut into large pieces
  • 3 Tablespoons Paul Prudhomme's Redfish Magic
  • 2 Teaspoons Creole seasoning
  • 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/2 Teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 Teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/3 Teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 4 leaves of butter lettuce
  • 1 Creole or Heirloom tomatoes, sliced
  • Leidenheimer's or other crispy po'boy bread
  • 1/2 Cup heavy mayonnaise
  • 1 Teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Teaspoons garlic powder

Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish - Recipes

Marine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is commonly known as redfish or spottail sea bass. It is a game fish native to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico and is found in coastal waters from Massachusetts to Tuxpan, Mexico. Red drum travel in shoals (schools) and are aggressive eaters, feeding on shrimp and small fish such as menhaden and mullet, at times in waters so shallow that their backs are exposed.

A stunningly beautiful, torpedo-shaped fish, red drum is more copper than red, with copper tipped fins and large copper scales along a broad back. It's most distinctive feature is one or more large black spots on the tail. Scientists believe that the spot may trick predators into targeting the tail rather than the head, allowing the fish a chance to escape.

Red drum has long been prized by recreational and commercial fishermen. The thrill of landing a brutish bull red continues to lure throngs of sports fishermen to coastal waters each year, so much so that recreational catch limits are tightly controlled. But the fun of the fight wasn&rsquot all that helped bring red drum fisheries to near collapse. Its distinctive flavor drove extraordinary consumer demand, transforming the popular game fish from a culinary unknown to center-of-the-plate stardom.

In the 70s New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme's Cajun-spiced red drum fillets, seared at very high temperatures in an iron skillet, ignited the palates of fish lovers and introduced many seafood "newbies" to the fish, too. Blackened redfish, as the dish became known, grew so popular that the Gulf Coast states quickly moved to protect the species by halting commercial sales of wild red drum and reducing recreational catch limits. As a result, fisheries pressures eased, and during the 80s and 90s, wild stocks began to recover to healthier levels.

Around the same period, aquaculture technology began to develop, and pioneer biologist David Maus built the first commercial redfish farm at Palacios, Texas. Today, red drum catch remains prohibited or tightly restricted. Fortunately for fish lovers everywhere, red drum aquaculture preserves our opportunity to enjoy this legendary fish in the future.


Watch the video: Cajun Blackened Redfish - Easy Blackened Redfish Recipe (January 2022).